Archive for the ‘Why we buy cars’ Category

Why the VW Beetle is the ultimate chick car

July 12th, 2009
VW Beetle

VW Beetle

Baby face
Baby face

Want to grab a woman’s attention? Just flash a baby’s face. Women are hardwired to find babies irresistable. And that’s a great thing for our species!

As I shared in my last post, scientists have confirmed that the human brain uses the same neural networks to recognize an approaching car as an approaching person. The headlights replace eyes, the hood the nose, and the grill the mouth.

Is there any surprise after comparing the pictures to the left that women, especially young women (who are at the peak of their fertility) love the ultimate chick car, the VW Beetle? Women respond to both a new Beetle and a new baby in the same swooning voice, “Isn’t it cute!” And VW thought that the flower vase was the big attraction!

And to my male readers, don’t dispair if you secretly or openly think the Beetle is for you. Women are also attracted to men who will help them produce and stay around to raise their offspring. We find you irresistable if you like babies…and Beetles.

 

Cars with “friendly faces” could be the key to saving the American Auto industry

July 11th, 2009
Anger

Anger

MDX 2009
MDX 2009

In October of 2001 my husband, Phil, and I bought an Acura MDX.   We have loved it and the service at our Acura dealership has been great.  After logging 145,000 miles we figured we’d trade this one in for the 2009 model.

So off we went this week for a test drive. In eight years Acura has improved all of the things we already loved about this car. So why didn’t we drive it home? Phil summed it up, “I hate the new front grill. The car looks angry.”

Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have shown that we recognize cars and trucks with the same neural networks “brain modules” that we use to recognize human faces. Determining if an approaching person is friend or foe has been crucial for men and women since the beginning of time. Similar to a stranger approaching you on the sidewalk, cars move towards you on the roads. Norman Dodge, MD says in his book, The Brain that Changes Itself, “It is likely that the (brain’s) face module was most competitively suited to process these shapes–headlights are sufficiently like eyes, the hood like a nose, the grill like a mouth–so that the plastic brain, with a little training and structural alternation, could process a car with its facial recognition system.”

People express anger by pulling the brows slightly together, pushing the chin out and raising the eyelids, causing a glaring look.  Do you think the MDX is glaring at you?